Tag Archives: drag conveyors

What’s Wrong With My Conveyor?

You weren’t hired because you were an expert in conveyor maintenance. Fortunately, when things go wrong, you have a resource you can turn to: Biomass Engineering & Equipment. Below is a chart of common problems and remedies for drag conveyors. When you encounter issues, it’s important to identify the root cause and not treat the […]

Choosing the Right Conveyor – Part 5

The Latest Conveyor Technology This is Part 5 in a series on choosing conveyors. For the previous article on designing your system, click here. We regularly post pictures of mechanical drag conveyors from the late 19th century and early 20th century on social media. What impresses us about these images is that many drag chain […]

Choosing the Right Conveyor – Part 4

Designing the Drag Conveyor This is Part 4 of a five-part series on selecting drag chain conveyors. For the previous article, click here. Choose Materials to Match the Environment Drag chain conveyors can transfer virtually any bulk material. But for one to perform well, it needs equipped with the proper materials. Conveyors must be designed […]

Why Use Plastic for Conveyor Paddles?

This is the second blog in a three-part series on plastics in conveyors. Click here to read the first article: Why Use Plastics in Conveyors? Why use plastic paddles in drag conveyors? Manufacturers have produced twin-chain drag conveyors for decades. Originally, these conveyors were little more than a steel connection between two chains and a […]

Optimizing Chains for Drag Conveyors

The chain is a major component in a drag conveyor’s design, and it’s as crucial to the conveyor’s performance as any other component. Drag conveyor chains are hardly ubiquitous, however, and each manufacturer touts the working load or construction or design of their chain. So what makes for the best drag conveyor chain? To answer […]

Conveyor Choices—Drag, Belt or Pneumatic?

Pellets are a hot item. And that’s a problem—not in terms of economic interest but in terms of their corrosive potential. When pellets pass from the pellet press, they’re hundreds of degrees Fahrenheit. This is problematic for the conveyor that transports them from the press to the pellet cooler infeed chute. Because of the pellet’s […]